Morgan Freeman Discusses Fibromyalgia Pain and Legalizing Marijuana

Many of you may know that actor Morgan Freeman suffers from fibromyalgia, although from his words his pain seems to be more localized to the left side of his body injured in a bad car accident and hasn’t gone full body yet. That doesn’t mean his symptoms don’t cause havoc full body. It’s just my guess. Anyway, I stumbled upon this article where Freeman discusses his fibromyalgia pain and says that marijuana is the only thing that provides him with pain relief. He says it’s benefits are enough that it should be legalized nationwide. It’s an interesting article and a quick read so I thought I’d share it.

Morgan Freeman Shoots Straight: On Legalizing Marijuana and His Escape From New York – The Daily Beast

freeman

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FibroGuide Resource

neck pain

Thanks to Seeking Equilibrium, I discovered FibroGuide. FibroGuide has a modules with great information for those newly diagnosed and those of us who have had fibromyalgia for what feels like forever. You take a simple quiz and it points you to the modules you may find most helpful. Examples of modules are Understanding Fibromyalgia, Fibro Fog, Being Active, Communicating, Sleep, Pacing Yourself, and more. It’s got a lot of great information and I really like how it’s organized. With the quiz, you are quickly pointed to the resources you may find most helpful and don’t have to go digging through a ton of information for the tidbits that are the most relevant for you. I don’t know about you, but my attention span is short and my thoughts are easily scattered so I found the way this site is organized to be very helpful. Check it out!

Collateral Damage

Reposted from Seeking Equilibrium.

I liked this post and wanted to share it. The graphic is a great graphic for the invisible face of pain too, I think.

two faces collateral damage

Why?
Societal pressure?
Weakness?

We are our own worst enemy. Every day we have to fight a war. War against pain, war against fatigue, war against an invisible illness that most don’t understand, war against indifferent doctors and war against pharmacies just trying to fill our prescriptions.

Why then do we turn the war on ourselves?

I’ve been to support meetings and read blogs and hear people talk about medication. Some even seem proud that they don’t and haven’t given in to prescription medication. That’s good if it works for them but to make anyone else feel less than human for taking them is wrong. Using medication that you might become physically dependent upon isn’t a sign of weakness. That is an unfortunate side effect of maybe feeling normal and productive.

We err on the side of the addict.

Maybe we’re trained that it’s greedy and selfish to want something for ourselves. All I know is every time I swallow a pill I feel weak.

And that, my friends, is stupid.

If we are responsible and knowledgeable about the power of the pills, if we “follow the rules” then there shouldn’t be any self-loathing about using narcotics or pills that help us get the restorative sleep we need. When did it become the norm that suffering is noble?

It isn’t.

We can do so much more when pain isn’t creating havoc in our bodies. If we can sleep then maybe, just maybe, we won’t be as stiff and sore in the morning. If that happens maybe, just maybe, we can get the exercise that we need. Don’t people get it? It’s a vicious cycle. We need exercise but it just hurts too much to start.

I think we need to like ourselves a little bit more and not look at medication as weakness. There are a lot of therapies out there and every one of us need to tweak them for our own use.  I don’t think we should feel bad for wanting to feel better.
We fight a war every single day.
And sometimes it feels like we should give up.
We can’t.
And we shouldn’t be one of the civilian casualties.

Quote of the Day – Champion

fight quote

People who suffer from chronic pain are champions. We fight our pain — our own bodies — every day, but we don’t give in. We keep fighting on. We keep getting up every time we are knocked down. We are fighters and survivors.

Does your greatest teacher have fur?

I wanted to share this great post on the difference pets can make to people suffering from chronic illnesses. Sometimes they even have their own invisible illnesses that they heal from while they help us heal, like Pup in this post: Does your greatest teacher have fur?

Archie and I relax on a bridge above a koi pond during a hotel stay.

Archie and I relax on a bridge above a koi pond during a hotel stay.

Like Pup, my dog, Archie, is my “therapy dog.” He’s a rescue too and I used to think I found him, but really he found me. He had Parvo as a puppy and almost died, so when I got him he had tons of skin problems, ear infections, and was skin and bones. It took awhile to get him on the right diet and get his skin issues cleared up. He still has some weird skin problems, I’ve learned. I changed his food last fall only to change it right back a few months later when the skin problems came back. He’s back to normal now. He knows when I’m really hurting; he snuggles with me and often positions himself on whichever hip or leg is aching the most to share his body heat with me. He knows when I’ve been sitting too long and annoys me until I get up and play with him or walk him. He motivates me to walk and exercise. I’m going through a divorce now and he’s been amazing. He comes running when I’m sad and licks the tears away. He’ll do something cute that makes me laugh so then he keeps doing it to keep me laughing. He doesn’t like when I cry.

When I was at my worst in February 2012 with my fibromyalgia, he literally knocked me on my butt and made me rethink how I was getting through the days. I let him out on a big leash and he dashed off after a squirrel so fast the leash swept my legs out from under me. I was bruised from my fall but it was the final straw and it led to me taking a 10-week medical leave from work so I could work on my health, nutrition, and emotional wellbeing and start clawing my way back from the sea of pain I was lost in. That leave from work was a huge turning point in my health and he was with me every day for it.  He always knows when he can push me to be more active and when he can’t. I don’t know what I would do without him. I know I wouldn’t be in as healthy a place now without him though.

Weather or Not – Fibromyalgia under Pressure

I stumbled upon this post from RebuildingWellness and wanted to share it. I’m on day 4 of a rain/storm induced flare up and am in dire need of some sunny, calm days to lower my pain levels. I wonder why we fibromyalgia sufferers are so sensitive to weather? My skull and jaw is where the worst of the pain and weather sensitivity presents. My skull feels like its being crushed by the pressure in the air and all the bones are grinding together. My jaw aches badly. How does your sensitivity to weather present? Please share your story here.

Lightening

WEATHER OR NOT — FIBROMYALGIA UNDER PRESSURE (By Sue)

WeatherGaugeDo you experience INCREASED fibromyalgia (and/or other chronic) symptoms with seasonal changes?

For most of us — yes, symptoms do increase.

But … which ones?

Some of you tell me that fatigue flares to unbearable levels during the heat – especially if there’s high humidity to boot. Some say their symptoms of pain are overwhelming when cold frigid winds blow. And, symptoms such as migraines, sinus pain, and allergic tendencies can increase during stormy and unpredictable weather.

Of course, there’s also the flurry of symptoms that increase right before a significant weather change. Most of us have experienced that type of flare. We really are sensitive beings, aren’t we?

To read more about being a “sensitive type,” read this post about my Tuning Fork Analogy.

Some of us feel as if we could hire ourselves out as weather forecasters or gauges. It makes sense! We’re surely more accurate than a groundhog, right? (I’ll have to do some research about Punxsutawney Phil’s annual salary….) We can predict rain, wind, heat, or significant change by the accompanying pain and fatigue in various parts of the body. For some, the physical impact centers around areas of former injury (broken bones, torn muscles/ligaments/tendons, etc.). For others, it centers around areas of consistent pain such as particular joints, sinuses, or an overall generalized overwhelming fatigue.

In studying the correlation between symptoms and the weather, we need to fine tune the question. We should ask, WHAT symptoms change and WHEN do they change?

For me, change is the operative word. Even though my symptoms are now very minor (for which I’m very grateful), I still pay attention to the slightest physical twinge. I’m aware of incoming weather fronts because my symptoms CHANGE when the weather is about to CHANGE. It’s more than the temperature, precipitation, wind, and humidity levels. For me, a barometric pressure change can be felt throughout the body. The bigger the weather change, the bigger the symptoms change.

Do barometric pressure changes affect you? If so, where do you feel it first, and for how long? Can you mitigate changes by taking preventative action such as increasing certain supplements, drinking more water, and getting regular exercise?

I can’t wait to hear what you think! Jot down your weather-related experiences below…

Human Barometer Meme

I wanted to share this funny meme with everyone. Thank you Google for giving me this funny pic which sums up how I’ve felt the last few days. The rain finally came last night and it brought some relief to my pain, but I’m still having a bad pain day. The rain is supposed to be here non-stop through Wednesday, if you can believe the weathermen. Happy Monday everyone!

human barometer